Keys to a Productive External Advisory Board, Part 1: Establishing Board Membership

Many of our universities use school- or college-level external advisory boards (EABs) for a variety of reasons. Some departments employ such boards as well. Academically related areas where boards can be particularly useful are providing curricular advice to academic departments, assessing the quality of graduates, and offering employment opportunities and internships or other forms of engagement to students. These board roles are particularly relevant for professional schools (e.g., business) and programs (e.g., IT-related) that prepare students for specific workplaces or positions in which changes in knowledge and skills are anticipated and must be addressed immediately. Other board roles may include providing insight into material and fiscal opportunities, such as the donation of used equipment, industry grants, and contract work that may otherwise be available to outside bidders; assisting with philanthropy, both corporate and individual; offering advice on dealing with the local political environment; providing feedback on new initiatives; and being conduits to their colleagues and other well-placed individuals on the excellence and value of the institution and school (or department).

Pure Heart Leadership

Pure Heart Leadership™ is a leadership approach that recognizing the individuality and strengths of leaders. This model that draws on my more than 20 years of professional experience within higher education and blends the ideas of Maslow, Rogers, and Bandura with a mindfulness approach to developing talent.

Promoting Faculty Development on a Tight Budget

In a dream world, every academic institution would be populated with a teaching and learning center coupled with a faculty enrichment meeting room. In fact, faculty would continually hone their skills as researchers and teachers in an engaged center on campus. Sounds great, right?

Six Questions to Ask to Successfully Establish a Program

Smooth implementation of programs, courses, and curricula of any size is a challenge. Program developers must identify, appraise, and effectively use resources, objectives, and educational methodologies and frameworks, making the process even more difficult and confusing. As Barbara Gross Davis puts it right at the beginning of her book Tools for Teaching, “Faculty must consider what material to teach, how best to teach it, and how to ensure that students are learning what is being taught” (Davis, 2009, p. 3). Life does not get any easier in higher education, and growing demands from educators expect launching educational innovations ranging from curricular sessions to new programs under time constraints. Patricia A. Thomas, David E. Kern, Mark T. Hughes, and Belinda Yim Chen’s groundbreaking program development text, Curriculum Development for Medical Education (2016), presents a six-step method relevant to any development context—from individual lessons to programs involving several departments and sessions. According to this approach, designing or revising a program or course in any learning environment boils down to asking the right questions at each step.

Creating a Policy and Procedures Manual Specific to Online Education

I’ve had the pleasure of serving as the University of Wisconsin–La Crosse’s primary online administrator for the past 12 years and recently was reflecting upon things we have done on our campus over that time span to promote and grow the number of online courses and programs we offer. While many colleges and universities have more extensive online offerings than we do, we have grown from two online programs and about 30 online courses a dozen years ago to about 15 online programs and 450 online courses today.

Addressing the Student Debt Crisis: Steps Universities Can Take

The US finds itself at a crossroads as it confronts the challenge of repaying student loan debt. Over the past 30 years in Michigan alone, state support for public colleges has flipped from about 75 percent of the revenue budget at regional universities to around 25 percent.
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Keys to a Productive External Advisory Board, Part 1: Establishing Board Membership

Many of our universities use school- or college-level external advisory boards (EABs) for a variety of reasons. Some departments employ such boards as well. Academically related areas where boards can be particularly useful are providing curricular advice to academic departments, assessing the quality of graduates, and offering employment opportunities and internships or other forms of engagement to students. These board roles are particularly relevant for professional schools (e.g., business) and programs (e.g., IT-related) that prepare students for specific workplaces or positions in which changes in knowledge and skills are anticipated and must be addressed immediately. Other board roles may include providing insight into material and fiscal opportunities, such as the donation of used equipment, industry grants, and contract work that may otherwise be available to outside bidders; assisting with philanthropy, both corporate and individual; offering advice on dealing with the local political environment; providing feedback on new initiatives; and being conduits to their colleagues and other well-placed individuals on the excellence and value of the institution and school (or department).

Pure Heart Leadership

Pure Heart Leadership™ is a leadership approach that recognizing the individuality and strengths of leaders. This model that draws on my more than 20 years of professional experience within higher education and blends the ideas of Maslow, Rogers, and Bandura with a mindfulness approach to developing talent.

Promoting Faculty Development on a Tight Budget

In a dream world, every academic institution would be populated with a teaching and learning center coupled with a faculty enrichment meeting room. In fact, faculty would continually hone their skills as researchers and teachers in an engaged center on campus. Sounds great, right?

What Should I Look for When Hiring New Online Faculty?

Content expertise is a given when hiring new online faculty members. But content expertise alone does not necessarily make an individual a good candidate for teaching online. There are additional skills that online faculty should possess to provide a solid online academic experience to students. And these skills differ depending on the type of online role that you’re seeking to fill.

Six Questions to Ask to Successfully Establish a Program

Smooth implementation of programs, courses, and curricula of any size is a challenge. Program developers must identify, appraise, and effectively use resources, objectives, and educational methodologies and frameworks, making the process even more difficult and confusing. As Barbara Gross Davis puts it right at the beginning of her book Tools for Teaching, “Faculty must consider what material to teach, how best to teach it, and how to ensure that students are learning what is being taught” (Davis, 2009, p. 3). Life does not get any easier in higher education, and growing demands from educators expect launching educational innovations ranging from curricular sessions to new programs under time constraints. Patricia A. Thomas, David E. Kern, Mark T. Hughes, and Belinda Yim Chen’s groundbreaking program development text, Curriculum Development for Medical Education (2016), presents a six-step method relevant to any development context—from individual lessons to programs involving several departments and sessions. According to this approach, designing or revising a program or course in any learning environment boils down to asking the right questions at each step.

Creating a Policy and Procedures Manual Specific to Online Education

I’ve had the pleasure of serving as the University of Wisconsin–La Crosse’s primary online administrator for the past 12 years and recently was reflecting upon things we have done on our campus over that time span to promote and grow the number of online courses and programs we offer. While many colleges and universities have more extensive online offerings than we do, we have grown from two online programs and about 30 online courses a dozen years ago to about 15 online programs and 450 online courses today.

LATEST ARTICLES

Addressing the Student Debt Crisis: Steps Universities Can Take

The US finds itself at a crossroads as it confronts the challenge of repaying student loan debt. Over the past 30 years in Michigan alone, state support for public colleges has flipped from about 75 percent of the revenue budget at regional universities to around 25 percent.

Petty Principles: Practical Branding Strategies for Women in Higher Education

Many women aspire to leadership positions in higher education. Yet research reveals that women continue to be underrepresented among deans, chief academic officers, provosts, and presidents (Gallant, 2014). Additionally, researchers have identified numerous motives for the persistence of this underrepresentation. For women to progress toward leadership positions in higher education can be a complicated, intricate, and multifaceted process (Johnson et al., 2010). Unfortunately, many are not afforded the opportunity to lead due to lack of knowledge, skills, or political maneuvering. According to Thomas, Bierema, and Landau (2004), women have not made advances in the academy, and they have not climbed career ladders with the same speed or ease as their male counterparts. The White House Project (2009) implied that having women leaders in higher education is much more than a mere gender parity issue: women leaders will potentially have a significant influence on institutions’ knowledge and scope of research. The presence of women in higher education leadership roles will contribute to positive and unique experiences for students that they will not have under gender-homogenous leadership.

How to Respond to Toxic Leadership: Six Practical Approaches

Do you work for a dean, provost, president, or department chair who belittles you regularly? Or someone who seems to enjoy criticizing you and brings up your past mistakes? Perhaps your leader is someone who believes they are destined for greatness and refuses to admit they have faults. Or do you report to a leader who has explosive outbursts and unpredictable moods? Maybe none of these apply and the person you work for is simply trying to solve problems with other departments and has asked you to help “bring them down.”

Building Trust among Employees: Secrets to Success

Change is everywhere in higher education (Ceschi et al., 2017; Warr Pedersen et al., 2017). Numerous articles discuss the rate of change, impending changes, and reflection of the changes made in higher education institutions (Bouckenooghe, 2010). But very little is written on how higher education professionals support faculty and staff in coping with such change. Additionally, higher education leaders are rarely prepared to cope with the rate of change or to support their faculty and staff through the change process (Cunningham, 2006). Professional development and mentoring opportunities for higher education leaders rarely focus on such topics (Cunningham, 2006). Conversely, coping and management of change is usually learned through practice and application. Yet, many leaders struggle to adapt to the newness that changes bring to a team, workplace culture, or to themselves as individuals (Hao & Yazdanifard, 2015; Mosquera et al., 2014).

Being a Young Chair: Advice I Wish I’d Received

Whoever said “Age ain’t nothing but a number” certainly never served as a division chair. I am equally certain that few division chairs have ever thought, “When I grow up, I plan on being the youngest chair in my division.” Yet after moving up the ranks from adjunct instructor to full-time faculty member to program coordinator, I found myself unenthusiastically assuming the crown jewel of academic management: division chairperson. In light of my youth, I wondered whether some faculty members expected me to use a high chair. My self-doubt and lack of information forced me to honestly assess my credentials, higher education skill set, and leadership abilities. There were lingering questions: Could I be an effective division chair? Was I simply too inexperienced? What would happen if I failed miserably? How could I address my self-doubt while gaining the confidence of others?

Can Innovation Be Taught?

As budgets tighten at colleges and universities, academic leaders are repeatedly urged to be more entrepreneurial in their approaches. “It’s time to think outside the box,” we’re told. “Be creative. Be daring. Be innovative.” But what do you do if you’re not a naturally innovative person? Or how can you be creative if the people who work in your area rarely seem to display much creativity? In short, can innovation be taught? And even if it is taught, can it be learned?
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Keys to a Productive External Advisory Board, Part 1: Establishing Board Membership

Many of our universities use school- or college-level external advisory boards (EABs) for a variety of reasons. Some departments employ such boards as well. Academically related areas where boards can be particularly useful are providing curricular advice to academic departments, assessing the quality of graduates, and offering employment opportunities and internships or other forms of engagement to students. These board roles are particularly relevant for professional schools (e.g., business) and programs (e.g., IT-related) that prepare students for specific workplaces or positions in which changes in knowledge and skills are anticipated and must be addressed immediately. Other board roles may include providing insight into material and fiscal opportunities, such as the donation of used equipment, industry grants, and contract work that may otherwise be available to outside bidders; assisting with philanthropy, both corporate and individual; offering advice on dealing with the local political environment; providing feedback on new initiatives; and being conduits to their colleagues and other well-placed individuals on the excellence and value of the institution and school (or department).

Pure Heart Leadership

Pure Heart Leadership™ is a leadership approach that recognizing the individuality and strengths of leaders. This model that draws on my more than 20 years of professional experience within higher education and blends the ideas of Maslow, Rogers, and Bandura with a mindfulness approach to developing talent.

Promoting Faculty Development on a Tight Budget

In a dream world, every academic institution would be populated with a teaching and learning center coupled with a faculty enrichment meeting room. In fact, faculty would continually hone their skills as researchers and teachers in an engaged center on campus. Sounds great, right?

What Should I Look for When Hiring New Online Faculty?

Content expertise is a given when hiring new online faculty members. But content expertise alone does not necessarily make an individual a good candidate for teaching online. There are additional skills that online faculty should possess to provide a solid online academic experience to students. And these skills differ depending on the type of online role that you’re seeking to fill.

Six Questions to Ask to Successfully Establish a Program

Smooth implementation of programs, courses, and curricula of any size is a challenge. Program developers must identify, appraise, and effectively use resources, objectives, and educational methodologies and frameworks, making the process even more difficult and confusing. As Barbara Gross Davis puts it right at the beginning of her book Tools for Teaching, “Faculty must consider what material to teach, how best to teach it, and how to ensure that students are learning what is being taught” (Davis, 2009, p. 3). Life does not get any easier in higher education, and growing demands from educators expect launching educational innovations ranging from curricular sessions to new programs under time constraints. Patricia A. Thomas, David E. Kern, Mark T. Hughes, and Belinda Yim Chen’s groundbreaking program development text, Curriculum Development for Medical Education (2016), presents a six-step method relevant to any development context—from individual lessons to programs involving several departments and sessions. According to this approach, designing or revising a program or course in any learning environment boils down to asking the right questions at each step.

Creating a Policy and Procedures Manual Specific to Online Education

I’ve had the pleasure of serving as the University of Wisconsin–La Crosse’s primary online administrator for the past 12 years and recently was reflecting upon things we have done on our campus over that time span to promote and grow the number of online courses and programs we offer. While many colleges and universities have more extensive online offerings than we do, we have grown from two online programs and about 30 online courses a dozen years ago to about 15 online programs and 450 online courses today.